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Most Famous People Buried in New Orleans’ Cemeteries

New Orleans is renowned for its cemeteries, which are some of the most famous in the world. Many of the city’s most famous residents are buried in these cemeteries, including jazz legend Sidney Bechet, literary luminaries like Tennessee Williams and Anne Rice, and even historical figures like Jean Lafitte and Marie Laveau. While some of the cemeteries are open to the public, others are only accessible by tour. However, all of them are worth a visit for anyone interested in New Orleans history and culture. Here are some of the most notable burials in New Orleans’ cemeteries.

Lafayette Cemetery No. 1

Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 is one of the most famous cemeteries in New Orleans, and it is also one of the oldest. It was established in 1833 and is located in the Garden District. The cemetery is home to a number of notable burials, including:

  • Sidney Bechet. Important jazz musician, Bechet was buried in Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 in 1959. His grave is marked by a bust of his likeness.
  • Tennessee Williams. A Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, Williams was buried in Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 in 1983. His grave is marked by a headstone engraved with a quote from one of his plays: “I have always depended on the kindness of strangers.”
  • Jean Lafitte. A famous pirate and privateer, Lafitte was buried in Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 in 1821. His grave is unmarked, but it is believed to be located near the front gate of the cemetery.
  • Marie Laveau. A legendary Voodoo queen, Laveau was buried in Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 in 1881. Her grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “Marie Laveau: Voodoo Queen.”

Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1

Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1 is the oldest cemetery in New Orleans, and it is also one of the most famous. It was established in 1789 and is located in the French Quarter. The cemetery is home to a number of notable burials, including:

  • Anne Rice. A best-selling author of horror fiction, Rice was buried in Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1 in 2002. Her grave is marked by a statue of her likeness.
  • Paul Morphy. A famous chess player, Morphy was buried in Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1 in 1884. His grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “Paul Morphy: A Genius.”
  • Père Antoine. A Catholic priest, Père Antoine was buried in Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1 in 1848. His grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “Père Antoine: A Faithful Servant.”
  • Etienne de Boré. A sugar planter, de Boré was buried in Saint Louis Cemetery No. 1 in 1796. His grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “Etienne de Boré: A Pioneer.”

Metairie Cemetery

Metairie Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in New Orleans, and it is also one of the most famous. It was established in 1872 and is located in Metairie. The cemetery is home to a number of notable burials, including:

  • Jefferson Davis. The President of the Confederate States of America, Davis was buried in Metairie Cemetery in 1889. His grave is marked by a large monument that reads “Jefferson Davis: President of the Confederate States of America.”
  • Huey P. Long. A controversial politician, Long was buried in Metairie Cemetery in 1935. His grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “Huey P. Long: Governor.”
  • William Faulkner. A Nobel Prize-winning author, Faulkner was buried in Metairie Cemetery in 1962. His grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “William Faulkner: Writer.”

Greenwood Cemetery

Greenwood Cemetery is a cemetery located in New Orleans East. It was established in 1901 and is the final resting place for many of the city’s most notable residents, including:

  • Fats Domino. A legendary musician, Domino was buried in Greenwood Cemetery in 2017. His grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “Fats Domino: Rock ‘n’ Roll Legend.”
  • Earl Long. A politician, Long was buried in Greenwood Cemetery in 1960. His grave is marked by a simple headstone that reads “Earl Long: Governor.”